On That Whole “Don’t Criticize The Pastor” Thing

The key is to understand what “criticism” really means before we tell people not to do it to the pastor. Because when we simply toss out “don’t criticize the pastor” as some unquestioning edict without thinking through the nuances of what it actually means, we create a space where corruption, sin, darkness, false knowledge, and destruction can grow unchecked. [Click title to read more.]

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The Problem of Christian Float

I call it Christian float: when believers can float into a church and even do all the “right” things in it (become a member, “plug in” to small groups or activities, participate in ministry) and somehow never end up fundamentally connected to anyone in the congregation. When they can show up faithfully and then leave the church after a day, a month, or after two years and find the reaction is exactly the same: indifference or ignorance. [Click title to read more.]

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Sometimes It’s Good To Let A Trend Go By

Churches have personalities, just like people do. They can be reflective or extroverted, friendly or cheerful, shy or quiet. They vary in size and in demographic makeup. Because of that, it stands to reason that it doesn’t make sense for every church to jump on every bandwagon – and yet, all too often, that’s what happens. [Click title to read more.]

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Churches: Don’t Work The Body To Death

When the next opportunity for service or ministry comes around, don’t cave in to the easy temptation to call the same old people (who are really so dependable and who will do it on such short notice!) and ask them to serve, or minister, or help, or provide in some way. Find other people to do it. Let it be known loudly that it’s time for that core group of workers to have a rest and that everyone else is going to have to start showing up. [Click title to read more.]

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When “Take Responsibility” Becomes “Why Should I…?”

What I want to focus on is that very often exhortations for other believers to “take responsibility” for their church experience aren’t our way of honestly trying to work out a difficult situation or to solve a problem together. Rather, too often, that question is a sly version of “Why should I…?” [Click title to read more.]

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